Water Quality

The City’s goal is to continuously provide a dependable supply of high quality drinking water to its customers. On the page below, you can find information about Pleasanton's drinking water, where it comes from, and how you can stay informed about your driving water. 

2019 Annual Pleasanton Water Quality Report

The technical and analytical water quality information presented in this report is required by State health regulations. These regulations require water suppliers to inform customers about where their water comes from, what is in their water, and any violation of safe drinking water standards that may have occurred during this past reporting period. This report provides results of all tests required to be performed on Pleasanton’s water supplies during 2019. We are happy to report that all 2019 water quality tests confirmed that water delivered to your tap met all applicable federal and state drinking water standards without any violations.

This report also includes information regarding steps taken by the City and Zone 7 Water Agency to improve drinking water delivered to customers in 2019, and opportunities for the public to participate in decisions that affect their drinking water quality. Phone numbers and web page addresses of the City and other public agencies responsible for water billing, delivery, supply, and water quality are also presented herein.

Prior Year Water Quality Reports

2019 Annual Water Quality Report
2018 Annual Water Quality Report
2017 Annual Water Quality Report
2016 Annual Water Quality Report
2015 Annual Water Quality Report
2014 Annual Water Quality Report

Pleasanton's Water Sources

Zone 7 Water Agency, the Valley’s water wholesaler, provides wholesale treated water to four major Valley water retailers, delivers untreated water to a number of agricultural customers, and monitors flood control measures and coordinates groundwater management resources in the Tri-Valley area. Approximately 80% of Pleasanton’s water is purchased from Zone 7 and is comprised of treated surface water blended with some local groundwater. The remaining 20% comes from local groundwater pumped from wells owned and operated by the City of Pleasanton. All water sources are disinfected and fluoridated before delivery to our customers.

UPDATE FOR SUMMER 2020:

To meet peak demands during the summer months, the City purchases water from Zone 7 and ordinarily operates two of its three groundwater wells (named Well 5, Well 6, and Well 8). The current operational status of the City's three wells are summarized below:

  • Well 5 is currently out of service due to unanticipated motor pump failure. Expedited repairs are underway with the goal of having Well 5 back in service in July, when peak water demands are at their highest.
  • Well 6 is operational.
  • Well 8 has been out of operation since June 2019 due to higher levels of PFAS detected in the Well (see next section below for more on this topic). Well 8 has been designated as the last priority well for operation and is ONLY anticipated to operate under abnormal conditions, such as extreme peak water demand or failures of other Zone 7/City water supply facilities.

The City is working diligently to return Well 5 to operation and improve the reliability of the City's groundwater supply for this summer. As a contingency, the City is also working with Zone 7 on ways to increase purchase water supply for this summer to help reduce the reliance on City wells. As is always the case, WATER CONSERVATION is encouraged to help reduce water demands, which in turn increases the reliability of our water supply!

Addressing PFAS in the City of Pleasanton

PFOA and PFOS are fluorinated organic chemicals that are part of a larger group of chemicals referred to as per- and poly-fluoalkyl substances (PFAS). PFOA and PFOS have been extensively produced in the United States since the 1940s. These manmade substances have been synthesized for water and lipid resistance and used in products such as carpets, clothing, fabrics for furniture, paper packaging for food, non-stick cookware, and fire-retarding foam. Between 2000 and 2002, PFOS was voluntarily phased out of production in the U.S. by its primary manufacturer. To find out more information about PFAS and Pleasanton's water system, please visit our PFOS and PFAS page.